Health insurers are vacuuming up details about you: ProPublica

Filed Under: Costs, Health plans, Patients

“To an outsider, the fancy booths at last month’s health insurance industry gathering in San Diego aren’t very compelling,” Marshall Allen writes over at ProPublica, in a story jointly published with NPR. “A handful of companies pitching ‘lifestyle’ data and salespeople touting jargony phrases like ‘social determinants of health.’ But dig deeper and the implications of what they’re selling might give many patients pause: A future in which everything you do — the things you buy, the food you eat, the time you spend watching TV — may help determine how much you pay for health insurance. With little public scrutiny, the health insurance industry has joined forces with data brokers to vacuum up personal details about hundreds of millions of Americans, including, odds are, many readers of this story. The companies are tracking your race, education level, TV habits, marital status, net worth. They’re collecting what you post on social media, whether you’re behind on your bills, what you order online. Then they feed this information into complicated computer algorithms that spit out predictions about how much your health care could cost them. Are you a woman who recently changed your name? You could be newly married and have a pricey pregnancy pending. Or maybe you’re stressed and anxious from a recent divorce. That, too, the computer models predict, may run up your medical bills. Are you a woman who’s purchased plus-size clothing? You’re considered at risk of depression. Mental health care can be expensive. Low-income and a minority? That means, the data brokers say, you are more likely to live in a dilapidated and dangerous neighborhood, increasing your health risks.  ‘We sit on oceans of data,’ said Eric McCulley, director of strategic solutions for LexisNexis Risk Solutions, during a conversation at the data firm’s booth. And he isn’t apologetic about using it. ‘The fact is, our data is in the public domain,’ he said. ‘We didn’t put it out there.’ Insurers contend they use the information to spot health issues in their clients — and flag them so they get services they need. And companies like LexisNexis say the data shouldn’t be used to set prices. But as a research scientist from one company told me: ‘I can’t say it hasn’t happened.'” Marshall Allen, “Health Insurers Are Vacuuming Up Details About You,” ProPublica.